Logo

The Art Studio

February 12, 2015

Three years ago, we left San Francisco to embark on a journey of ‘finding more space’. Our goal was to find a space where I could have an art studio and my now wife, then girlfriend could have a home office. We didn’t have to look long before we had our eyes set on the […]

Blog Post

The Art Studio

February 12, 2015 . By Peter DeLucchi . Leave Comment

Three years ago, we left San Francisco to embark on a journey of 'finding more space'. Our goal was to find a space where I could have an art studio and my now wife, then girlfriend could have a home office. We didn't have to look long before we had our eyes set on the Cotton Mill Studios. The CMS is an old cotton mill built in the late 1800's.  When I was a kid, this building was a self serve storage facility.  Almost ten years ago, the CMS was converted into work/live lofts. We fell in love with the Cotton Mill immediately, and it wasn't long before we were moving in. Our space is a large open area with about a third of it lofted. Upon moving in, the empty concrete floors were a thrill to fill with our ideas of home and business. First, I needed to build a partial height wall to serve as a perimeter for the studio and workshop. I set off to find salvage wood, and found most of it close by in Oakland, and the fir for the front facing wall I removed from and old feed and grain mill in Petaluma that was being demolished. We love the warm look of the old wood and it separates our space nicely while utilizing a style matching the existing materials and mood of the Cotton Mill. Peter DeLucchi Half Wall Project Salvage wood from an old feed and grain mill in Petaluma repurposed to serve as a partial height wall between my art studio and the rest of our suite. Peter DeLucchi Half Wall Project Connecting the stud wall to the footprint floated on top of the concrete floor. Two large workbenches now stand on top of the wood surface. Peter DeLucchi Half Wall Project Hanging the beautiful old tongue and groove douglas fir. Peter DeLucchi Half Wall Project A double door creates a six foot wide opening to move large equipment, artwork, and allow extra light to enter the rest of the space as well. Peter DeLucchi Half Wall Project The douglas fir panels were buffed with beeswax and orange oil for a classic, minimal finish. Peter DeLucchi Art Studio photo by Josj LaCunha Our cozy reading and living room area. Photo By Josh LaCunha.

Tables and Metal Work

February 12, 2015

Since moving to the East Bay, we have had the opportunity to meet and make many new friends. Our building has a unique environment, many of the tenants know each other and maintain a good level of comradery and friendship.  Also, this being a work-first building there are many artists and creative folks here. One […]

Blog Post

Tables and Metal Work

February 12, 2015 . By Peter DeLucchi . Leave Comment

Since moving to the East Bay, we have had the opportunity to meet and make many new friends. Our building has a unique environment, many of the tenants know each other and maintain a good level of comradery and friendship.  Also, this being a work-first building there are many artists and creative folks here. One of these people that I have gotten to know over the last three years is my friend Jeff Ritter.  Jeff has been a painter, metal worker, and mixed media artist for most his life.  We instantly became friends with our similar tastes in art and thoughts on what art should and can be.  We definitely disagree on these topics as well!  And, that makes for a good creative process. For many years now, I have had the desire to learn and include metal work into both my artwork and tool box of skills.  With Jeff and his full metal shop where he now lives, that opportunity has presented itself.  For quite awhile we would talk about collaborating on metal projects.  Then, this idea finally took shape through his mentoring and teaching of metal skills.  I am forever grateful for this exposure and experience.  The first projects were small sculptures and objects, and now the work has blossomed to its present state. At the moment we have embarked on the production of a series of steel tables, and I love where it is going. Fun, organic shapes for the tops and legs with the look of animation and life.  These sturdy (mostly smaller) tables demonstrate functional art and have a sense of life and spirit within them.  I am very excited and inspired to see where this will take us. I hope you enjoy them as much as we do. [instagram_emb url="http://instagram.com/p/t_d4GXhELT/"] [instagram_emb url="http://instagram.com/p/ydYO8KhEJ8/"] [instagram_emb url="http://instagram.com/p/vzBHpcBEP7/"] [instagram_emb url="http://instagram.com/p/yn3DJqhEEW/"]

From S.F. to Oakland

February 1, 2015

The move to Oakland was definitely a big one for me. Having grown up in San Francisco and believing I would never leave, this change was quite a flip of the script. Along with those thoughts was the realization of a fresh opportunity, new inspirations, and a new understanding of the East Bay. Really, when […]

Blog Post

From S.F. to Oakland

February 1, 2015 . By Peter DeLucchi . Leave Comment

The move to Oakland was definitely a big one for me. Having grown up in San Francisco and believing I would never leave, this change was quite a flip of the script. Along with those thoughts was the realization of a fresh opportunity, new inspirations, and a new understanding of the East Bay. Really, when you grow up in the city, you rarely ever go east across the bay, so there was much, much more to explore so close to what I knew as my home. I still draw a ton of inspiration from all my favorite spots in SF from my childhood and adult life. However, now I am exploring the East Bays hills, shoreline and estuary, and Mt Diablo environment on a much more intimate level. This new view has helped me grow my perspective on the Bay Area and allowed the introduction of new, exciting subject matter I wouldn't have otherwise been in direct contact with. In terms of oil painting, I am working on a continuing series of images inspired by the plants and landscape on Mt. Diablo. So far this has included California Buckeyes, and the vast expanses of Ceanothus, Chamise, Juniper, Oaks and the list goes on..  

My previous life in produce

September 17, 2014

Before making the decision to become a painter full-time, I had a full life of caring for and moving produce from farms to trucks to homes. Attending to produce is no small task, as the product is 100% perishable and expires before our eyes. I always saw it as my responsibility to honor the many […]

Blog Post

My previous life in produce

September 17, 2014 . By Peter DeLucchi . Leave Comment

Before making the decision to become a painter full-time, I had a full life of caring for and moving produce from farms to trucks to homes. Attending to produce is no small task, as the product is 100% perishable and expires before our eyes. I always saw it as my responsibility to honor the many hands in labor and have the least amount of wasted produce as possible. This meant there was a small window of time in which I had to get produce into the kitchens of customers. Beautiful displays, fine tuning price points and selecting the best quality fruits and vegetables became my daily meditation for a decade of my life. Mt Davidson Market San Francisco Leo DeLucchi My grandfather, Leo DeLucchi (left), in 1939 at the DeLucchi family market, Mt. Davidson Market, in San Francisco's West Portal neighborhood. My journey into produce came naturally after I finished my BFA at UC Santa Cruz. I had just finished using scholarship money to travel for 7+ months around most of Europe with my back pack and tent. And when I returned, I wasn't ready to leave the Santa Cruz Mountains, but needed a job so I started working at New Leaf in Boulder Creek as a produce buyer. And while a job in produce was new to me, I guess you could say it was in my blood. My great-great grandpa Joseph ran a produce ranch in Colma, just south of SF in the 1870"s. He also raised flowers adjacent to the San Souci Creek (where the "wiggle" bike route now runs through the Haight) and operated an artesian well, too. Fun side note; my great-great grandpa Joseph's nickname at the SF produce wholesale market was "San Souci" which means "without care". My great grandpa Antonio ran a produce market in the same neighborhood on Lyon Street until W.W.1. when he would work at the ship yards at pier 70 (Potrero Point). My grandpa Leo became involved in produce in the early 1920's and along with my great uncle Jess, owned and operated a grocery store in San Francisco's West Portal neighborhood up to the mid/1970's. When I left Bonny Doon and moved back to San Francisco in 2003, I worked as a produce buyer and managed a work crew of ten for Real Food Co. on Stanyan Street, minutes away from the now paved over San Souci Creek. The San Souci still runs, underground, methodical, and without a care. I never had a chance to meet my grandfather but when my folks tell stories about him and his store, I feel warmly connected the man who also spent days and nights connecting a community with good food. I am proud and grateful to have shared this in this labor tradition that has given me an unique view onto the San Francisco and California landscapes. Leo DeLucchi, my grandfather, at the Mt. Davidson Market of San Francisco's West Portal My grandfather, Leo DeLucchi (left).